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Financial Symmetry: Balancing Today with Retirement

When considering retirement, do you wonder what financial opportunities you may be missing? Busy lives take over and years pass without taking advantage. In this retirement podcast, Chad Smith and Mike Eklund unveil financial opportunities, to help you balance enjoying today so you are ready to retire later. By day, they are fiduciary fee-only financial advisors who answer questions about tax savings, investment decisions, and how to save more. If you’ve been putting off your financial to-do list or are just not sure what you’ve been missing, subscribe to the show and learn more at www.financialsymmetry.com. Financial Symmetry is a Raleigh Financial Advisor. Proudly serving clients in the Triangle of North Carolina for over 20 years.
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Now displaying: July, 2018
Jul 30, 2018

One of the difficulties in decisions around retirement, is most people only get one chance. One of the more essential decisions centers around when and how you choose to take Social Security. Maximizing your benefit has huge impacts to you retiring well. So this is not a subject that should be independent of your complete retirement financial plan. Carefully analyzing the best options could mean hundreds of thousands dollar differences for you throughout retirement.  So in this episode, we answered 8 of the top questions we hear about social security in less than 30 minutes. Our hope is that you'll have a desire to dig deeper in your on analysis, to assure you are making the best decisions for you and your family.

Who is eligible for social security?

The social security program was created in 1935 to promote the economic security of the American people. It takes about 10 years of work history for someone to become eligible for the benefits. The system works on credits and you need 40 credits over your lifetime (earn up to 4 a year). If you're married, you're eligible for spousal benefits especially if you don’t have as much of a robust work history. There are also disability and widower benefits. If you land in the latter category you should work with a CFP to help you understand your best filing options. Social security benefits are calculated by taking your highest 35 years of earnings and your benefits are calculated by these.

When should I claim social security?

The big question that everyone wants to know is, when should I claim social security benefits? The trick is, the answer is different for everyone. You can start claiming social security at age 62, which 34% of people do, or you could wait until age 70, which only 4% of claimers do. Full retirement age ranges from ages 65-67. Claiming your benefit before your full retirement age reduces your benefits by 5-6% annually. So claiming at age 62 could be a reduction of 25%. On the flip side, every year you wait to claim social security after full retirement age, your benefit grows by 8%. When deciding when to claim your benefit, health and life expectancy also should play a role in your decision. The decision about when to claim is an important one that can have significant financial ramifications.

Married couples have more benefit strategies to consider

A married couple has a lot to consider when it comes to thinking about filing for social security benefits. A spouse that hasn’t worked as much as the other is entitled to 50% of the higher earner’s social security benefit. For those born before January 1, 1954, the restricted benefit is still an option. Where one spouse, can take a "restricted" benefit equal to half their spouses monthly benefit. If one spouse passes early then the other spouse is entitled to the higher earner’s benefit amount. There are 3 main options for couples to consider: both spouses delaying, the higher earner delaying, or both taking early benefits. With singles, it is much easier to decide when to get your benefits, but still should be weighed with other income sources and current market environments.

When will Social Security run out?

A big influence on why people take Social Security early is the fear that it won't be there in the years to come. We've heard for years that the social security fund will eventually run dry. While it's true that the worker to retiree ratio is getting smaller, we shouldn’t have to worry about the program completely running dry in our lifetimes. Current projections show that social security will not be able to fully fund retirees beginning between 2033-2035. But, the system won’t run out completely and it could fund 70% if nothing is done to solve the problem. A few of the potential solutions include:

  • Pushing the claiming age out (last extension in 1983 only affected those 45 and younger at the time)
  • Increasing Social Security taxes through payroll deductions
  • Benefit Cuts to certain income levels

Listen in to hear the rest of the questions chocked full of useful information to help you uncover the mysteries behind the social security system.

Outline of This Episode

  • [2:07] What is social security?
  • [3:07] Who is eligible?
  • [7:00] When should I claim social security?
  • [13:05] Married couples have more social security strategies to consider than singles
  • [17:37] What about widows and divorcees
  • [19:07] Social security taxes
  • [21:49] When will social security run out?

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Jul 16, 2018

Do you ever feel financial advisors speaks a different language? Many clients feel their advisors throw around financial terminology that creates more confusion than clarity. Financial planners use mnemonics and acronyms since they are a great way to remember things. But the shorthand can be confusing to those that are unfamiliar with them. According to Investopedia, there are around 1900 financial acronyms, and more being created daily. Join us on this episode as we decode 10 of the most common to give you a head start in the next meeting with your advisor.

Do you let FOMO direct your investment decisions?

FAANG and FOMO go hand in hand. FAANG refers to the hot tech stocks like Apple, Netflix, and Google. This acronym is reminiscent of the late 90's tech stock boom when there were only 5 or 6 tech stocks that were sustaining the entire market. FOMO (the fear of missing out) leaves you feeling like you are getting left behind if a decent portion of your portfolio is not invested in these stocks. This is where it's important to recognize how your emotions are influencing your investing decisions. History shows us the slippery slope letting your emotions drive your investing can be.

How BPS is just as important as GPS

BPS is how a mutual fund expense ratio or financial advisor's fee is often quoted. BPS simply stands for Basis Points, the number of decimals after a whole number. For example, 50 BPS is 0.50%. Understanding the total annual cost of your investing strategies can help you more accurately compare the value you are getting from your investment strategy or financial planning relationship.

In the third slot is the CAPE ratio. This is an acronym for the Cyclically Adjusted Price Earnings ratio, a popular measure to help judge whether the stock market is cheap or expensive according to historical averages. A highly correlated long-term indicator of future returns, the CAPE ratio continues to be a good measure for understanding the stage of the market cycle.

Are you part of the FIRE generation?

FIRE is a newer movement, developing more over the last 10-15 years. It stands for Financially Independent, Retire Early. Many people are looking for the flexibility to work less or retire earlier in life. Folks that attempt to drastically limit spending or save considerably may be trying to achieve FIRE. Given the gravity of these decisions and the length of low to little expected income, it's most important to understand the risks. This is where evaluating your full financial picture with annual cash flow comparisons and tax planning opportunities can add extra benefits at the margins.

Should you do a QCD from your RMD or use your DAF?

Does your financial advisor speak like this? Do you just nod your head and play along? Understanding these terms could shave your tax burden considerably if used correctly. QCD, DAF, and RMD are important acronyms for the charitably inclined which can also lower your annual tax burdens. RMD is the Required Minimum Distribution that you are required to take at age 70 ½ each year. QCD is the Qualified Charitable Distribution if you are over the age of 70 ½ which sends a percentage of the RMD directly to charity, therefore, reducing your taxable income.

Listen to this episode to hear all 10 financial acronyms decoded (plus a few bonus ones) to be fully engaged at the next meeting with your financial advisor.

Outline of This Episode

  • [1:27] Acronyms are a great way to remember things
  • [5:17] FAANG
  • [6:21] FOMO
  • [7:40] CAPE
  • [8:51] BPS
  • [9:56] FIRE
  • [12:10] RMD
  • [13:58] QCD
  • [14:38] DAF
  • [15:52] NAPFA
  • [17:48] ACH
  • [19:39] REIT
  • [20:44] ETF

Resources & People Mentioned

Connect With Chad and Mike

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Jul 2, 2018

You have been hearing about Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies for the past few years now. Nothing attracts the attention of the public like the possibility of missing out on the latest craze. The fear of missing out or “FOMO” can be extremely powerful. So you may be wondering whether Bitcoin or another cryptocurrency might be worthwhile to invest in. Like anything money related, it is important to understand what you are getting yourself and your money invested in. Listen to this episode to learn more about what Bitcoin is, the risks involved, and how cryptocurrencies work.

What is Bitcoin and how do cryptocurrencies work?

Bitcoin is a worldwide cryptocurrency and digital payment system. It was invented in 2009 by a person or group of people named Satoshi Nakamoto, and it is still unknown who exactly the founder was. There are now more than 1500 cryptocurrencies in the virtual world today. Cryptocurrencies are different than regular currency because there is no bank or government backing them. Cryptocurrencies are created by mining. Like gold, cryptocurrencies have a limited supply which is where their value comes from. Listen to this episode to learn more about Bitcoin and how cryptocurrencies work.

What are the risks of Bitcoin?

There are many risks to buying Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies including, regulatory, security, insurance, fraud, security, and market risks. The government can essentially outlaw cryptocurrencies if it so chooses. There is a security risk in protecting your purse or online wallet. Someone can hack into your wallet and steal your coins. Your money at the bank is insured by the FDIC, but cryptocurrencies are not. So if someone does steal your coins you will not be insured. How do you know that you are buying real Bitcoin? The risk of fraud when buying cryptocurrencies is real. The price has see-sawed up and down dramatically over the past 8 years so along with all the other risks, there are substantial market risks. Listen to this episode to become informed on all the risks associated with Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies

Is Bitcoin an investment or a speculation?

Investments are something you can estimate the expected returns of by reading up on the background of the stock or bond. By researching the growth rate and fundamental value of an investment you can get an idea of what you may think the future return will be. The value of Bitcoin is dependent upon what someone else is willing to pay you and the history of it is all over the map. For this reason, we feel that cryptocurrencies are a speculation rather than an investment. Listen to this episode to hear why we feel that cryptocurrencies are not something you should invest a significant amount of money in and why you should not try to use Bitcoin to fund your retirement.

What is blockchain and why is it important?

Although cryptocurrencies are tumultuous and it can be difficult to see what their future may bring, blockchain technology may have a big role to play in the future. Bitcoin is distributed by a blockchain which is a publicly distributed ledger. The technology of blockchain may completely change over time. The future of blockchain may include payment processing, money transfers, digital voting, and real estate or title transactions. Cryptocurrencies may not be the best investment but they have opened a new frontier in digital money and accounting. Listen to this episode to hear why blockchain technology could be so important to the future of money.

Outline of This Episode

  • [0:27] Why you need to know about Bitcoin and cryptocurrency
  • [4:17] What is cryptocurrency?
  • [8:07] What are the risks of Bitcoin?
  • [13:40] What are the tax implications?
  • [14:20] Is Bitcoin an investment or a speculation?
  • [16:11] What is blockchain?

Resources Mentioned

Connect With Chad and Mike

Subscribe To This Podcast

Apple Podcasts <> Stitcher <> Google Play

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